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Disability Guidance Issued By The Department for Transport

 

Blind or Partially Sighted

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Profoundly or Severely Deaf

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Without Speech

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Walking Disability

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Guidance on assessing ability to walk


 "(i)  they cannot walk or…"


Being unable to walk means that they cannot take a single step.


They need to show that because of their disability they cannot put one foot in front of the other.


Walking involves always having one foot on the ground.


If their only way of getting about is to swing through crutches then they will be considered unable to walk.


 "(ii) …they are virtually unable to walk, or…"


They will need to show that they are unable to walk very far without experiencing severe discomfort.


Discomfort can mean either pain or breathlessness.  Extreme fatigue and stress may also be taken into account.  It has been accepted that discomfort is subjective and that some people have higher pain thresholds than others.


Unless both legs are missing then they will need to show that they experience severe discomfort even when using an artificial aid.


When deciding whether they are virtually unable to walk the following factors should be taken into account:

  • the distance over which they can walk without experiencing severe discomfort
  • the speed at which they can walk
  • the length of time for which they can walk
  • the manner in which they can walk

If they can only walk up to 27 metres without severe discomfort then they will qualify for the statutory concession.


If they can only walk between 27 and 64 metres without severe discomfort then it is likely that they will qualify for the statutory concession.


If they can walk more than 64 metres without severe discomfort then they will need to show that the other three factors mean that they are virtually unable to walk. For example, if they can show that it takes them five minutes to walk 100 metres, they should qualify for the statutory concession.


As a guide, the average person can walk the following in a minute:

  • 90 metres at a brisk pace
  • 60-70 metres at a moderate speed
  • 40-50 metres at a slow pace
  • 30-40 at a very slow pace

It does not matter whether the severe discomfort occurs at the time of their walk or later. What counts is that the discomfort is a direct result of their attempt to walk.


"(iii) The exertion required to walk would "constitute a danger to their life or would be likely to lead to a serious deterioration in their health."


The test here is whether the exertion required to walk would constitute a danger to their life or whether it would be likely to lead to a serious deterioration in their health.


They need to show that they should not walk very far because of the danger to their health.


This criterion is intended for people with serious chest, lung or heart conditions.


Some people with haemophilia may also qualify for the statutory concession in this way.
The serious deterioration does not need to be permanent but it should require medical intervention for them to recover.


They will need to show that any danger to their health is a direct result of the physical effort required to walk.


People with epilepsy will need to show that any fits were brought about by the effort required to walk.

 

 

Loss of the Use of Both Arms

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Learning Disability - that is, a state of arrested or incomplete development of mind which includes significant impairment of intelligence and social functioning.

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Refused Grant of a Driving Licence - would, if he applied for the grant of a licence to drive a motor vehicle under Part III of the Road Traffic Act 1988, have his application refused pursuant to section 92 of the Act (physical fitness) otherwise than on the ground of persistent misuse of drugs or alcohol.

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i. epilepsy (unless it is of a type which does not pose a danger - see below);

ii. severe mental disorder;

iii liability to sudden attacks of giddiness or fainting (whether as a result of cardiacdisorder or otherwise);

iv. inability to read a registration plate in good light at 20.5 metres (with lenses if worn);

v. other disabilities which are likely to cause the driving of vehicles by them to be a source of danger to the public.

 

(a) People with restricted visual fields, who will be refused a licence if they do not have a horizontal field of vision of at least 120 degrees, or if they have significant scotoma encroaching within 20 degrees of the central fixation point in any meridian or, sometimes, if they have restricted vertical fields of vision;

(b) Insulin dependent diabetics. In general people with insulin dependent diabetes can continue to drive - though their licence may be renewable on a 1, 2, or 3-yearly basis. However, where the person experiences disabling hypoglycaemia they will be prevented from driving until their diabetes is controlled.